RIVERSIDE FIRE AUTHORITY

SERVING OUR NEIGHBORS IN:

CENTRALIA

HANAFORD VALLEY

SEMINARY HILL

COOKS HILL

LINCOLN CREEK

INDEPENDENCE

GARRARD CREEK

RIVERSIDE FIRE AUTHORITY 1818 Harrison Avenue Centralia, Washington 98531
We’re YOUR fire department.
Riverside Fire Authority (RFA) is seeking voter approval of a one-year excess levy for operations and equipment. These funds will purchase two new fire trucks to replace well- worn vehicles and improve fire services in the entire RFA response area. Q Where is the Riverside Fire Authority located and what services are provided? A We are the FIRE/EMS department that protects one-third of Lewis County’s population. We serve about 24,000 residents in NW Lewis County from 2 staffed stations in Centralia and 6 volunteer stations located at Big Hanaford, Seminary Hill, Cooks Hill, Lincoln Creek, Independence and Garrard Creek Valleys. Our 22 full-time and 45 volunteer members answered 4,028 calls in 2018, that is 34% of the emergencies in Lewis County. Q How much money will be collected through this levy? A We can acquire two pumper/tenders with $985,000 collected from this levy matched by $150,000 that we have saved toward their purchase. Q How much is my share of the levy? A Based on the 2019 Lewis County Assessor’s valuation of all taxable properties within our service area, approximately 47 cents/thousand assessed valuation increase for one   year will generate the needed funds. Your share depends on the value of your home and property. As an example, if you own a $200,000 home and property, this levy would add approximately $94 ($7.84 per month) to your property tax for one   year . The total cost would be approximately $141.00 ($11.75 monthly) for a home and property valued at $300,000. Q When will the levy be collected, and for how long? A The levy will be collected for just one year from January 1 to December 31, 2020. Q How is this a cost-effective use of the levy funds? A One combination pumper/tender replaces two vehicles. This reduces our overall purchase cost, fleet size, and ongoing maintenance costs. Q Why does RFA need this money? A In 2011 the amount of property taxes collected for the RFA reached a high point. Then the economic recession and a significant loss of industry values struck. The RFA budget has been smaller each year since 2011 now totaling reductions of more than $6,000,000,00 In example. Our 2018 budget was 18% less than in 2011. Inflation has increased by 11% since 2011. That equals a 29% drop in that year alone. Over the last 5 years we have made adjustments to operate within our means including: o eliminating 8 full-time positions, reducing our full-time firefighting work force from 30 to 22 personnel o Implementing cost containment strategies addressing personnel, tools, training, and fleet- building maintenance. o Securing non-tax revenue including grants and fees for services. We have stabilized the service programs and controlled expenses, but there are not enough dollars left over to purchase big ticket items, specifically new fire trucks Q What is a combination pumper/tender? A It is a fire truck designed to respond in both the City and the Country. It combines all the equipment and water carrying capacity that is needed to effectively fight fires in buildings, vehicles, grass and brush. Q Why do you need these pumper/tenders? A 1) We need to replace fire trucks that are now at the end of their useful lives. Ten years ago, when the RFA was formed, we immediately began eliminating unneeded duplicated equipment. Our goal to “right size” the department continues today. Each of these new trucks will do the work of two separate vehicles. 2) As our trucks wear and age, front-line vehicles move to reserve status and eventually they are retired. We now have two 41-year old fire trucks and one 33-year-old fire truck on the front lines. Our reserve fire truck is 28 years old. The main fire truck at the Pearl Street Station has cost more than $57,000 in repairs over the last 4 years. When it is frequently out of service, we must rely on the 28-year-old reserve truck. Increasing maintenance costs and poor reliability are very concerning the four trucks to be replaced add up to 143 years of service. 3) Major fires continue to plague the communities we serve. In the last 4 years RFA has responded to 144 serious fire incidents that tragically caused 4 deaths, 15 civilian injuries and more than $4,000,000 in property damage. Reliable fire trucks are key to a timely response. Q How long are these new pumper/tenders expected to serve? A We intend to use them 25 years on the front line and 10 years in reserve. Q How many yes votes do you need for the levy to pass? A A 60-percent supermajority is required to approve this levy. Q What happens after the vote? A Whatever the outcome of the vote the RFA will provide the best possible service using available resources in the most efficient manner possible. Responding to emergencies with 30- and 40-year- old trucks increases the chance of a response delay due to vehicle breakdowns. When the RFA responds to an emergency call, more than 35% of the time we are dispatched to second or third simultaneous emergencies. Reliability is essential when all resources are needed at once.
· ·
2019 VEHICLE REPLACEMENT LEVY
QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS
PLEASE CAST YOUR VOTE ON
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2019
RIVERSIDE FIRE AUTHORITY

SERVING OUR NEIGHBORS IN:

CENTRALIA

HANAFORD VALLEY

SEMINARY HILL

COOKS HILL

LINCOLN CREEK

INDEPENDENCE

GARRARD CREEK

RIVERSIDE FIRE AUTHORITY 1818 Harrison Avenue Centralia, Washington 98531
We’re YOUR fire department.
Riverside Fire Authority (RFA) is seeking voter approval of a one-year excess levy for operations and equipment. These funds will purchase two new fire trucks to replace well-worn vehicles and improve fire services in the entire RFA response area. Q Where is the Riverside Fire Authority located and what services are provided? A We are the FIRE/EMS department that protects one-third of Lewis County’s population. We serve about 24,000 residents in NW Lewis County from 2 staffed stations in Centralia and 6 volunteer stations located at Big Hanaford, Seminary Hill, Cooks Hill, Lincoln Creek, Independence and Garrard Creek Valleys. Our 22 full-time and 45 volunteer members answered 4,028 calls in 2018, that is 34% of the emergencies in Lewis County. Q How much money will be collected through this levy? A We can acquire two pumper/tenders with $985,000 collected from this levy matched by $150,000 that we have saved toward their purchase. Q How much is my share of the levy? A Based on the 2019 Lewis County Assessor’s valuation of all taxable properties within our service area, approximately 47 cents/thousand assessed valuation increase for one    year will generate the needed funds. Your share depends on the value of your home and property. As an example, if you own a $200,000 home and property, this levy would add approximately $94 ($7.84 per month) to your property tax for one   year . The total cost would be approximately $141.00 ($11.75 monthly) for a home and property valued at $300,000. Q When will the levy be collected, and for how long? A The levy will be collected for just one   year from January 1 to December 31, 2020. Q How is this a cost-effective use of the levy funds? A One combination pumper/tender replaces two vehicles. This reduces our overall purchase cost, fleet size, and ongoing maintenance costs. Q Why does RFA need this money? A In 2011 the amount of property taxes collected for the RFA reached a high point. Then the economic recession and a significant loss of industry values struck. The RFA budget has been smaller each year since 2011 now totaling reductions of more than $6,000,000,00 In example. Our 2018 budget was 18% less than in 2011. Inflation has increased by 11% since 2011. That equals a 29% drop in that year alone. Over the last 5 years we have made adjustments to operate within our means including: o eliminating 8 full-time positions, reducing our full-time firefighting work force from 30 to 22 personnel o Implementing cost containment strategies addressing personnel, tools, training, and fleet-building maintenance. o Securing non-tax revenue including grants and fees for services. We have stabilized the service programs and controlled expenses, but there are not enough dollars left over to purchase big ticket items, specifically new fire trucks Q What is a combination pumper/tender? A It is a fire truck designed to respond in both the City and the Country. It combines all the equipment and water carrying capacity that is needed to effectively fight fires in buildings, vehicles, grass and brush. Q Why do you need these pumper/tenders? A 1) We need to replace fire trucks that are now at the end of their useful lives. Ten years ago, when the RFA was formed, we immediately began eliminating unneeded duplicated equipment. Our goal to “right size” the department continues today. Each of these new trucks will do the work of two separate vehicles. 2) As our trucks wear and age, front-line vehicles move to reserve status and eventually they are retired. We now have two 41-year old fire trucks and one 33-year-old fire truck on the front lines. Our reserve fire truck is 28 years old. The main fire truck at the Pearl Street Station has cost more than $57,000 in repairs over the last 4 years. When it is frequently out of service, we must rely on the 28-year-old reserve truck. Increasing maintenance costs and poor reliability are very concerning the four trucks to be replaced add up to 143 years of service. 3) Major fires continue to plague the communities we serve. In the last 4 years RFA has responded to 144 serious fire incidents that tragically caused 4 deaths, 15 civilian injuries and more than $4,000,000 in property damage. Reliable fire trucks are key to a timely response. Q How long are these new pumper/tenders expected to serve? A We intend to use them 25 years on the front line and 10 years in reserve. Q How many yes votes do you need for the levy to pass? A A 60-percent supermajority is required to approve this levy. Q What happens after the vote? A Whatever the outcome of the vote the RFA will provide the best possible service using available resources in the most efficient manner possible. Responding to emergencies with 30- and 40- year-old trucks increases the chance of a response delay due to vehicle breakdowns. When the RFA responds to an emergency call, more than 35% of the time we are dispatched to second or third simultaneous emergencies. Reliability is essential when all resources are needed at once.
· ·
2019 VEHICLE REPLACEMENT LEVY
QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS
PLEASE CAST YOUR VOTE ON
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2019